Preparing for IEP

5things

Two articles about working with teachers came to our attention this weekend. I summarized the key points of the first article in the slide above, and clicking on the image will take you to the full article. The second article is simply titled “Parents and the IEP.” My favorite points in this article are as follows:

  • In real life, PARENTS know their children very well and are an excellent resource for teachers when it comes to understanding the kids as individual people, which is something we should all want to strive for doing to a T.
  • In real life, TEACHERS decided to become teachers instead of choosing other careers for a constellation of reasons, one of the chief ones more than likely being because they care about children.
  • In real life, a CHILD is a little person … You want to really know that kid, know what makes him or her tick.

As we advocate to get special ed assistance and services for our son I need to remember the “we are on the same team” line when it’s time to work on his IEP. It even applies to my husband and I when we disagree on what’s best for him.

It’s ironic, that even though both of us are teachers, we have not really been to an IEP meeting before. Part of the reason is because we’ve taught overseas for the last 12 years, and the other reason is our attendance as music and computer teachers is seldom required. The international school we taught at did not have a special ed program in Pre-K and K levels, so we have basically been doing home-based interventions with a privately hired therapist who aligned their sessions as close to what my son’s pre-k class was doing as possible. So as first time parents we really had a lot of catching up to do when we moved to the US and enrolled our son in kindergarten class this past summer.

The most useful thing we recommend is Wrightslaw. Don’t just buy their books, attend their seminar if possible, because this is where they will guide you through the important parts of the books.

Advertisements

One thought on “Preparing for IEP

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s